International Olympic Committee and GE Healthcare Launch Analytics Tool

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Dashboards provide real-time analytics on injury types and illness outbreaks to help clinicians improve Olympic athletes’ health, performance, and safety.

GE Healthcare has launched a new analytics tool built for the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games and the Toyko 2020 Games. The new tool was designed with input from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and integrates athlete injury and illness data, sport and training procedures and venue info to give trainers and clinicians a complete view of an athlete’s health to enable faster, more informed treatment.

The insights will also be used to improve the GE Athlete Management Solution (AMS). AMS collects a wide variety of data, including imaging scans, vitals, venue and event information, and more and displays it in a real-time dashboard that can help medical staff personalize treatment and see trends in illness and injury across the Games. It’s cloud-based and allows entry of and access to data from anywhere at anytime.

“Through digital transformation, the IOC is pursuing its mission of helping to prevent injuries among our world-class athletes,” said Dr. Richard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director for the IOC. “With 40 sports across the Olympic Games and Olympic Winter Games, each athlete requires unique healthcare monitoring and care. AMS will provide information that helps clinicians personalize training and treatment, so Olympians are best positioned to compete.”

See also: 5 ways IoT is reshaping healthcare

AMS is multilingual to allow team doctors from different countries to collaborate with each other. Supported languages include English, French, Arabic, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, German, Spanish and Korean. Critical info such as approved medications is integrated into the tool.

Staff from the Center for Disease Control, The Public Health England Centre of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control and the Korean Center for Disease Control have all be trained on AMS and will use it to monitor public health throughout the Games.

 

Sue Walsh

About Sue Walsh

Sue Walsh is a freelance writer and social media manager living in New York City. Her specialties include tech, security and e-commerce. You can follow her on Twitter at @girlfridaygeek.

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